“From Transylvania to North Hills: Tracing Our Spiritual DNA of Religious Freedom”

 

In sixteenth-century Transylvania, Unitarian congregations were established for the first time in history when the Protestant Reformation took hold in the remote mountains of Transylvania in eastern Europe.

Here the first edict of religious toleration in history was declared in 1568 during the reign of the first and only Unitarian king, John Sigismund. Sigismund’s court preacher, Frances David, had successively converted from Catholicism to Lutheranism to Calvinism and finally to Unitarianism because he could find no biblical basis for the doctrine of the Trinity. Arguing that people should be allowed to choose among these faiths, he said, “We need not think alike to love alike.”

Our history has carried us from liberal Christian views about Jesus and human nature to a rich pluralism that includes theist and atheist, agnostic and humanist, pagan, Christian, Jew, and Buddhist.

These churches continue to preach the Unitarian message in present-day Romania. Like their heretic forebears from ancient times these liberals could not see how the deification of a human being or the simple recitation of creeds could help them to live better lives. They said that we must follow Jesus, not worship him.

As our history continues to evolve and unfold, we invite you to join us by choosing our free faith.

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